Kentico-Copy-UI-Cultures

Kentico How To: Copy UI Culture Strings to a New Culture

I’ve been with my current company for a little over a year now. I was hired to manage the conversion of one of their main websites to a new Content Management System (CMS). While this may not seem like a huge challenge, when you factor in the current site supports 10+ languages and 20+ countries, I definitely had some learning to do.

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Choc-PNut-Butter-Oatmeal-Stout

Chocolate Peanut Butter Oatmeal Stout – version 1

Somewhere I got the idea that it would be a good idea to brew a peanut butter beer. I scoured the web for ideas and most suggested using Bell Plantation PB2 (powdered peanut butter) or drying out all-natural peanut butter. Fast forward a few months. I had the opportunity to taste Terrapin’s Liquid Bliss at the 12 South Winter Warmer and then another peanut butter beer a month or so later at a homebrew club meeting. Both lacked the peanut butter punch that I was hoping to have with my brew.

As I grew closer to brewing the beer, I finally found a good source of feedback on a shared recipe. I used the Chocolate Covered Beavr Nutz recipe as a base. Opinions and amounts of peanut butter powder varied, but 12oz. seemed to be the consensus. So modified the recipe for a few ingredients I had on had and I added flaked oats for a thicker mouth feel.


Choc-PNut-Butter-Oatmeal-Stout

For the peanut butter, I went with 4oz of plain PB2 suspended in a hop-sack for the last 15-minutes of the boil. After two weeks of fermentation, I added a full 16oz. package of Chocolate PB2 straight into the fermenter and let that soak for 2 weeks. I cold crashed for 72 hours before kegging and I had no issues. All of the PB2 had settled to the bottom of the bucket quite nicely.

As far as taste goes, it was good. I served about 2 gallons at one event while it was still a little young in the keg. You could get a hint of peanut butter on the nose, but the taste was all chocolate. While that wasn’t a bad thing, it wasn’t the peanut butter beer I wanted. I served the remainder of the keg at another event a week later. By this time, the peanut butter was more prominent on the nose and slight on the palate.

Several noted there was a slight fruity after-taste in the beer. Since I used S-05 and fermented in a 66-degree controlled environment, I knew it wasn’t from the yeast. After tasting some of the Chocolate PB2 by itself, I believe this is what contributed that flavor. While not a bad flavor, it most certainly masked some of the other flavors I wanted to come through in the beer.

So, for Chocolate Peanut Butter Oatmeal Stout version 2 I think I will make the following adjustments.

  • No PB2 in the boil
  • 16oz of Plain PB2 in the secondary for 7-14 days
  • Cocoa Nibs in the secondary (I’ll have to determine the amount and time for these)

We’ll see how it comes out and I’ll post an update when I finally get to version 2. If you’re interested, my modified recipe is below. If you brew, definitely leave a comment and let me know what you changed and how it comes out.

Chocolate Peanut Butter Oatmeal Stout
American Stout
Type: All Grain Date: 3/25/2013
Batch Size (fermenter): 6.00 gal Brewer: Phillip Duncan
Boil Size: 7.76 gal Asst Brewer:
Boil Time: 60 min Equipment: My Equipment
End of Boil Volume 6.76 gal Brewhouse Efficiency: 72.00 %
Final Bottling Volume: 5.50 gal Est Mash Efficiency 78.0 %
Fermentation: Ale, Two Stage Taste Rating(out of 50): 30.0
Taste Notes:

Ingredients

Ingredients

Amt Name Type # %/IBU
11 lbs 8.0 oz Brewers Malt 2-Row (Briess) (1.8 SRM) Grain 1 74.7 %
1 lbs 4.0 oz Chocolate Malt (450.0 SRM) Grain 2 8.1 %
1 lbs Oats, Flaked (1.0 SRM) Grain 3 6.5 %
12.0 oz Caramel/Crystal Malt -120L (120.0 SRM) Grain 4 4.9 %
8.0 oz Roasted Barley (300.0 SRM) Grain 5 3.2 %
6.4 oz Wheat – White Malt (Briess) (2.3 SRM) Grain 6 2.6 %
1.00 oz Chinook [13.00 %] – Boil 60.0 min Hop 7 35.9 IBUs
0.50 oz Select Spalt [4.75 %] – Boil 60.0 min Hop 8 6.6 IBUs
0.50 oz Mt. Hood [6.00 %] – Boil 45.0 min Hop 9 7.6 IBUs
0.50 oz Select Spalt [4.75 %] – Boil 20.0 min Hop 10 4.0 IBUs
2.0 pkg Safale American (DCL/Fermentis #US-05) [50.28 ml] Yeast 11 -

Beer Profile

Est Original Gravity: 1.067 SG Measured Original Gravity: 1.082 SG
Est Final Gravity: 1.017 SG Measured Final Gravity: 1.010 SG
Estimated Alcohol by Vol: 6.6 % Actual Alcohol by Vol: 9.5 %
Bitterness: 54.0 IBUs Calories: 278.5 kcal/12oz
Est Color: 41.4 SRM

Mash Profile

Mash Name: Single Infusion, Full Body, Batch Sparge Total Grain Weight: 15 lbs 6.4 oz
Sparge Water: 4.80 gal Grain Temperature: 72.0 F
Sparge Temperature: 168.0 F Tun Temperature: 72.0 F
Adjust Temp for Equipment: TRUE Mash PH: 5.20
Mash Steps

Name Description Step Temperature Step Time
Mash In Add 19.25 qt of water at 172.5 F 152.0 F 45 min
Sparge Step: Batch sparge with 2 steps (0.92gal, 3.88gal) of 168.0 F water
Mash Notes: Simple single infusion mash for use with most modern well modified grains (about 95% of the time).

Carbonation and Storage

Carbonation Type: Keg Volumes of CO2: 2.3
Pressure/Weight: 12.54 PSI Carbonation Used: Keg with 12.54 PSI
Keg/Bottling Temperature: 45.0 F Age for: 30.00 days
Fermentation: Ale, Two Stage Storage Temperature: 65.0 F

Notes

Added 4oz of Bell Plantation PB2 in thelast 10 of boil in a hop sack. After 2 weeks of fermentation, I added 16oz Bell Plantation Chocolate Peanut Butter and let it secondary for 2 more weeks.Next batch, I’d probably add the 16oz plain PB2 and cocao nibs, as I think the chocolate PB2 added a somewhat friuty finish that I somewhat did not like.

Bell-Plantation-PB2

 

Guys-American-Kitchen

Scathing Review of Guy Fieri’s New Restaurant

Guys-American-Kitchen

I just stumbled across this absolutely scathing review of Guy Fieri’s new restaurant in New York called Guy’s American Kitchen and Bar. Sad to say, that even with the bad review from The New York Times, placed firmly in the trendy Times Square area it will probably survive with a combination of name recognition and tourist dining.

Somewhere within the yawning, three-level interior of Guy’s American Kitchen & Bar, is there a long refrigerated tunnel that servers have to pass through to make sure that the French fries, already limp and oil-sogged, are also served cold?

By no means do I frequently read restaurant reviews, but based on that quote alone I’d say it was an unpleasant experience. Read the full review if you want a full two pages of sharp-witted comments. I’m a little wary of the review, wondering if the critic has a dislike of Fieri’s personality or if the food and service were actually that bad. As a celebrity chef, you certainly set yourself up for heavy critiquing. People familiar with your product (food and persona) certainly expect something and could be disappointed if you don’t deliver.

I remember watching Guy on The Next Food Network Star and thinking he was entertaining. From the 8 seasons of Food Network Star, Guy is certainly the most successful winner and could also be the most hated Food Network chef celebrity. I remember reading a lengthy article about him on CityPages. If you’ve got a few minutes to spare, “Diners, Drive-Ins and Disasters” is well worth reading. It’s a lengthy interview with Diners, Drive-Ins and Dives series creator David Page regarding the fall-out he had with Fieri and the Food Network.

Everyone can form their on opinion of Fieri. There’s no doubt he helped shine the spotlight on many small restaurants serving excellent food that needed the promotion. Perhaps along the way he let his personality take over.

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